Right and or Wrong

Here’s a simple arithmetic question: A bat and ball cost a dollar and ten cents. The bat costs a dollar more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?

Right or WrongMost people will respond quickly and confidently, insisting the ball costs ten cents. This answer is both obvious and wrong. (The correct answer is five cents for the ball and a dollar and five cents for the bat.)

Decisions seem to depend on a long list of mental shortcuts, which often lead to foolish decisions. These shortcuts aren’t a faster way of doing the math; they’re a way of skipping the math altogether. In the above arithmetic lesson we tend to default to the answer that requires the least mental effort.

In a lake, there is a patch of lily pads. Every day, the patch doubles in size. If it takes 48 days for the patch to cover the entire lake, how long would it take for the patch to cover half of the lake?

Your first response is probably to take a shortcut, and to divide the final answer by half. That leads you to twenty-four days. But that’s wrong. The correct solution is forty-seven days.

 

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